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Armenia-syria Relations: Armenians in Syria, Armenian Genocide Memorial Church, List of Syrian Armenians Books LLC

Armenia-syria Relations: Armenians in Syria, Armenian Genocide Memorial Church, List of Syrian Armenians

Books LLC

Published May 26th 2010
ISBN : 9781156970799
Paperback
32 pages
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 About the Book 

Chapters: Armenians in Syria, Armenian Genocide Memorial Church, List of Syrian Armenians. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 30. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can selectMoreChapters: Armenians in Syria, Armenian Genocide Memorial Church, List of Syrian Armenians. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 30. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: Armenian, Arabic The Armenians in Syria are Syrian citizens of either full or partial Armenian descent. Syria and the surrounding areas have often served as a refuge for Armenians who fled from wars and persecutions such as the Armenian Genocide. According to Armenian diaspora organizations estimated that there are 150,000 Armenians in Syria, most of whom live in Aleppo. But in fact the number of the Armenian population in Syria has declined during the recent 20 years, and it roughly counts 100,000 nowadays. The town of Kesab has also a majority of Armenians within Syria. A narrow path in Jdeydeh, leads to the old Armenian quarter of Hokedun, AleppoArmenia under Tigranes the Great subjugated Syria, and chose Antioch as one of the four capitals of the short lived Armenian Empire. During Antiquity, there was some Armenian presence in Northern Syria, however it wasnt a considerable one. Christianity became the official religion of Armenia in 301 largely thanks to the efforts of Saint Gregory the Illuminator. Armenian merchants and travelers often frequented Antioch, one of the earliest sites of Christian teaching and practice, and had relations with the even closer Christian centers of Edessa and Nisibis, all of which are located in Greater Syria, where Christianity flourished in apostolic times. When the Seljuk Turks conquered Armenia from its previous Byzantine rulers, waves of Armenians left their homeland in order to find a more stable place to live. Most Armenians established themselves to Cilicia where an Armenian kingdom was founded, but some chose Northern Syria. Armenian quarters were formed in towns or cities such ...More: http: //booksllc.net/?id=656378